New Labor Forum

Archive for 2012|Yearly archive page

On the Contrary: Manufacturing the Future: Why Reindustrialization Is the Road to Recovery

In Regular Edition on September 28, 2012 at 7:05 am

By Mark Levinson

Four and a half years after the crash, the American economy sputters along. Twenty-three million workers cannot find full-time work, and the percentage of the employed population has hardly budged since it hit bottom two and a half years ago. Republicans argue that we should reduce the deficit (a disastrous policy); Democrats urge a new stimulus (a necessary step, but not sufficient to repair our economy). Missing from our national discussions about economic revitalization—even in arguments made by many of the nation’s progressive economists—is the need to restore a badly damaged manufacturing sector. Read the rest of this entry »

On the Contrary: Class Unconsciousness: Stop Using “Middle Class” to Depict the Labor Movement

In Regular Edition on May 23, 2012 at 1:04 pm

George Orwell thought the precise and purposeful deployment of our language was the key to the kind of politics we hoped to advance. By that standard, virtually everyone—from the center to the left, from Barack Obama to Richard Trumka to the activists of Occupy Wall Street—has made a hash of the way we name the most crucial features of our society.

Exhibit A is the suffocating pervasiveness with which we use the phrase “middle class” as the label we have come to attach to not just all of those who are hurting in the current economic slump, but to the entire stratum that used to be identified as working class. Read the rest of this entry »

On the Contrary Earth to Labor: Economic Growth Is No Salvation

In Regular Edition on February 28, 2012 at 9:41 am

By Sean Sweeney

The notion that economic growth is, almost by definition, a good thing has been subjected to serious and well-informed criticism in recent years. Diverse organizationally, geographically, and ideologically, those challenging growth are united by one realization: the world’s ecosystems are in a state of extreme distress and the planet will be unlivable in just a few decades. Climate change, ocean acidification, species extinction, desertification, ozone depletion, and alarming levels of water contamination and scarcity are part of a long list of crises that have their origins in one thing—economic activity that increasingly raids the world’s stores of “natural capital” and pollutes and degrades everything in its path. Read the rest of this entry »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.